Posts tagged gifs


Going batty in Walt Disney’s “The Cat’s Out” (1931)

Going batty in Walt Disney’s “The Cat’s Out” (1931)

9,186 notes

thedailydoodles:

"Prolonging the In-between"
Stuck in your own limbo, but happy where you areA job that pays the bills and keeps gas in your car.Your young days are long over, but adulthood hasn’t arrivedProlonging the In-between is where you found you thrived.
No marriage and no kids; haven’t gone to school for yearsWatching all your silly peers stress over their careersStaying where you are, avoiding most of “the next big step”The contrivance of it all seems to be only for an artificial rep.
And that’s all fine, if it’s even true; it’s a luxury to live and whineYou just want to be happy, and the In-Between seems fine.
(Starring Andreas Zeichenwege from Zeichenwege.tumblr.com!  Check out his great illustrations and comics)
Wanna appear in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK  SOCIETY6

thedailydoodles:

"Prolonging the In-between"

Stuck in your own limbo, but happy where you are
A job that pays the bills and keeps gas in your car.
Your young days are long over, but adulthood hasn’t arrived
Prolonging the In-between is where you found you thrived.

No marriage and no kids; haven’t gone to school for years
Watching all your silly peers stress over their careers
Staying where you are, avoiding most of “the next big step”
The contrivance of it all seems to be only for an artificial rep.

And that’s all fine, if it’s even true; it’s a luxury to live and whine
You just want to be happy, and the In-Between seems fine.

(Starring Andreas Zeichenwege from Zeichenwege.tumblr.com!  Check out his great illustrations and comics)

Wanna appear in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!
FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK
  SOCIETY6

1,421 notes

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.
EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.

EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

(Source: pr0fundum)

454,396 notes

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade
Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)
Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 
Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  
Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.
By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade

Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)

Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 

Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  

Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.

By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

987 notes